A Complete Guide to Become a Family Nurse Practitioner (2024)

A Complete Guide to Become a Family Nurse Practitioner (1)

Family nurse practitioners, also referred to as FNPs, are in high demand. They are also referred to Advanced Practice Nurses or APRN’s.

Recently ranked #2 of the 100 Best Jobs of 2022 by U.S. News & World Report, this rewarding and lucrative career offers registered nurses greater salary potential, increased autonomy and high levels of job satisfaction.

You may have questions about the FNP role, which is why we compiled this resource detailing everything you need to know about how to become a family nurse practitioner. So why become a nurse practitioner? Continue reading to discover information about FNP salary, roles and responsibilities, job outlook, work hours and more!

Earn Your MSN-FNP Part-Time For Less than $30k

What Is a Family Nurse Practitioner?

A family nurse practitioner is a registered nurse who has received the specialized clinical and educational training necessary to practice primary family-focused patient care. Like a family physician, a family nurse practitioner works with patients of all ages to diagnose medical conditions, treat illness, prescribe medications and maintain health over the lifetime.

The laws regulating family nurse practitioners differ from state to state. Certain states require FNPs to work under the supervision of a physician. In many states, however, family nurse practitioners are authorized to work independently.

What Does a Family Nurse Practitioner Do?

Think of a family nurse practitioner as a registered nurse who is licensed to perform many of the same roles as a family doctor. A family nurse practitioner sees patients of all ages for scheduled or drop-in health care appointments. Depending on state restrictions, he or she performs physical exams, orders diagnostic tests and procedures, diagnoses illnesses, prescribes and administers treatment, and educates patients on how to develop and maintain healthy lifestyles.

Be sure to also check out our "What Does a Nurse Practitioner Do?" Infographic.

Registered Nurse (RN) vs. Nurse Practitioner (NP)

When comparing the RN role to the NP role, many differences exist. The most significant one is that NPs are licensed to prescribe, able to diagnose, order laboratory studies, and diagnostic testing. To become an NP, you have to be an RN first. NP practices and responsibilities may differ state to state, but the overall role doesn’t change. The role of the RN is to observe, create nursing diagnoses, and carry out orders made by a physician or NP. NPs have autonomy over their patients because of their advanced training and continued education to a Masters prepared level.

The table below compares the RN vs. NP

Education

Training

Salary

Roles

Job outlook

Registered Nurse

At least 2 years in a RN degree program and pass the NCLEX-RN exam. RNs must complete CEUs to maintain licensure (varies by state)

Clinical, hands on training is required in most nursing programs

Median Range $75,330

assess,
perform tasks,
critically think,
educate, create care plans

Growing need

Nurse Practitioner

RN program + NCLEX-RN exam + a NP pathway to Masters Degree.

NPs must complete CEUs related to their specific specialty’s requirements

Additional clinical training + additional certifications as needed per program

Median Range $120,680

assess,
perform tasks,
critically think,
educate + more autonomy, prescribing rights, medically diagnose and create treatment plans.

Growing need

Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) vs. Nurse Practitioner (NP)

What’s the difference between a family nurse practitioner (FNP) and a nurse practitioner (NP)? In short, a family nurse practitioner is a subcategory or subspecialty of the nurse practitioner role. All FNPs are NPs, but not all NPs are FNPs. While most nurse practitioners are trained to work in a particular area of health care or with a specific population, family nurse practitioners are trained to treat people of all ages and genders.

A nurse practitioner is an advanced practice nurse who holds a master’s or doctorate degree in nursing and who has completed clinical training beyond that required to become a registered nurse. He or she must undergo rigorous national certification and maintain clinical competency through continuing education. Nurse practitioners can specialize in a wide range of clinical areas, including acute care, gerontology, pediatrics, psychiatric health and women’s health.

A family nurse practitioner is a nurse practitioner who specializes in family health care. “Family” refers to a focus on health care services that revolve around the family unit, including health promotion and disease prevention for children, adolescents, adults, women and the elderly, across the entire lifespan.

The chart below describes the differences between FNPs vs NPs.

Specialization

Training

Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP)

Family practice - Cares for patients of all ages.

A RN who advanced education to a MSN and specialized in FNP and obtained certification as an FNP.

Nurse Practitioner (NP)

Depends on the type of specialty the Nurse Practitioner chooses. The specialty depicts the population type the NP would work with in practice.

Examples include Acute Care NP, Neonatal Nurse NP, Pediatric NP, and Women’s Health NP

A RN who advanced education to a MSN as a general NP.

History of the Nurse Practitioner Role

The nurse practitioner profession is more than 50 years old. From its inception in 1965 to today, the role of nurse practitioner has transformed health care in the United States.

In 1965, the U.S. government expanded Medicare and Medicaid coverage to include low-income women, children, the elderly and people with disabilities. With such a large influx of people qualifying for health insurance coverage, the country did not have enough physicians to meet the needs of the population. The nurse practitioner profession began in response to this physician shortage, concentrated especially in rural areas.

In 1974, the American Nurses Association (ANA) founded the Council of Primary Care Nurse Practitioners, which helped legitimize the nurse practitioner role. Three years later, it began offering NP certification exams. Another professional organization, the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (now known as the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, or AANP), was established in 1985 and began tracking the number of NPs in a national database.

In the 1990s, the number of nurse practitioners rose from about 40,000 in 1995 to 68,000 by 1999. The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 made nurse practitioners eligible for direct reimbursement, and by 2000, nurse practitioners were able to legally practice in all 50 states.

Today, there are more than 325,000 licensed nurse practitioners in the United States, 69.7% of whom are certified in family care. The AANP continues to advocate for increasing the number of NPs and granting them full practice authority.

A Complete Guide to Become a Family Nurse Practitioner (2)

Where Do Family Nurse Practitioners Work?

Family nurse practitioners work providing patient care in a variety of settings. While many choose to work in private practice, others work in settings such as retail clinics, hospitals and schools.

  • Private Practice: Many FNPs work in private practice outpatient clinics, where they focus on providing primary care to their supervising physician’s patients or their own patients.
  • Retail Clinics: It is becoming common for FNPs to work in retail health clinics. Often these clinics are open during regular business hours up to seven days a week and attract a high percentage of walk-in patients.
  • Urgent Care Centers: Urgent care centers are where patients go for non-emergency urgent care such as minor fractures, sprains and allergic reactions, all of which FNPs are trained to handle.
  • Hospitals: Some FNPs choose to work in hospital settings. Because their training is in primary care, FNPs who want to work in hospitals often obtain additional certification as an acute care nurse practitioner or emergency nurse practitioner.
  • Schools: A small percentage of FNPs work in schools where they provide primary care for students.

How Much Do Family Nurse Practitioners Make?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the median annual wage for a nurse practitioner was $120,680 in May 2021. This is over $43,000 more than the 2021 median annual wage of a registered nurse at $77,600.

The mean annual wage for a nurse practitioner is $118,040.

What Is the Job Outlook for Family Nurse Practitioners?

The job outlook for family nurse practitioners is very good. Since the United States is currently facing a shortage of primary care physicians, there is a surging demand for family nurse practitioners. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts about 29,400 openings for Advanced Practice Nurses each year on average over the next decade.

Family Nurse Practitioner Work Hours

Family nurse practitioner work hours differ depending on the setting that the FNP works in. FNPs who work in private practice often have standard 9-5 work hours, Monday through Friday. Family nurse practitioners who work in retail or urgent care clinics may work later hours and/or weekends, while those who work in hospitals may have non-traditional hours.

FNPs who work in school settings adhere to typical school hours (i.e., 8:30am to 3:30pm, Monday to Friday for elementary schools and 7:30am to 2:30pm, Monday through Friday for high schools).

Qualities of a Family Nurse Practitioner

Succeeding as a family nurse practitioner requires a unique set of skills and personal attributes. In addition to the hard skills obtained through education and certification, an FNP must possess soft skills like communication, active listening and empathy.

Common traits and skills possessed by successful FNPs include:

  • Compassion
  • Mental and physical endurance
  • Communication skills (e.g., active listening)
  • Enthusiasm
  • Optimism
  • Patience
  • Empathy
  • Confidence

Learn more about the qualities of a successful nurse practitioner.

Family Nurse Practitioner Roles and Responsibilities

A family nurse practitioner has many important roles and responsibilities. Just like a primary care physician, a FNP provides diagnosis, treatment, disease management, health education, and preventive health care services. Depending on the state they work in (see Family Nurse Practitioner Scope of Practice), FNPs have the authority to:

  • Manage chronic health conditions like hypertension and diabetes
  • Treat minor acute injuries (such as sprains and strains) and illnesses (such as flu)
  • Provide health care to people of all ages, from infants and children to adults and the elderly
  • Conduct health assessments and physical examinations
  • Oversee women’s health requirements, including preconception and prenatal care
  • Educate patients about health, wellness and disease prevention throughout the lifespan
  • Order and interpret diagnostic tests
  • Prescribe medication

FNPs work with a broad patient population including members of all genders and ages. In many parts of the country, particularly in rural areas, family nurse practitioners are the sole primary care providers in FNP-led care clinics.

Family Nurse Practitioner Scope of Practice

Each state has its own set of rules and regulations that determine to what extent a family nurse practitioner can practice primary care.

The AANP divides states into three categories based on their regulatory laws: full practice, reduced practice and restricted practice. In full practice states, FNPs have the authority to assess patients, diagnose conditions, order diagnostic exams and provide treatments. In reduced practice states, FNPs are required to collaborate with another health care provider in at least one aspect of practice. In restricted practice states, FNPs are required to be supervised or directly managed by another health care provider in at least one aspect of practice.

As of May 2020, the following states (plus Washington, D.C.) grant full practice authority to FNPs:

  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Iowa
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Minnesota
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Mexico
  • North Dakota
  • Oregon
  • Rhode Island
  • South Dakota
  • Vermont
  • Washington
  • Washington, D.C.
  • Wyoming

A Complete Guide to Become a Family Nurse Practitioner (3)

Family Nurse Practitioner vs. Doctor: What’s the Difference?

There is a lot of overlap between the roles of a family doctor and a family nurse practitioner (see "Family Nurse Practitioner Roles and Responsibilities") but the two are not equivalent.

One major difference between doctors and FNPs is the amount of schooling required. Family physicians are required to have a Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree, which takes an average of 11 years of schooling, including undergraduate education. Family nurse practitioners require a bachelor’s degree in nursing (BSN) and a master’s degree in nursing (MSN-FNP), which takes approximately five to six years of schooling.

In reduced or restricted practice states, FNPs may be required to collaborate with a physician in order to carry out certain aspects of their role, such as prescribing pharmaceuticals.

How to Become a Family Nurse Practitioner

Becoming a family nurse practitioner is a straightforward process with several steps.

To become an FNP, you must:

  • Get licensed as a registered nurse.
  • Obtain a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree.
  • Obtain a Master of Science in Nursing degree with an FNP specialty (MSN-FNP).
  • Become certified by passing the national FNP certification exam offered by either the ANCC or AANP.
  • Apply for state licensure as an FNP.

Get licensed as a registered nurse: The minimum requirements for obtaining RN licensure are an associate’s degree or diploma in nursing and a passing grade on the NCLEX-RN exam. Once these conditions are met, you can apply for state licensure through your state board of nursing.

Obtain a BSN degree: RNs with an associate’s degree or diploma can complete an RN to BSN degree program or fast-track their advanced education with a streamlined RN to MSN-FNP degree program.

Obtain an MSN-FNP degree: Various MSN-FNP options are available for registered nurses depending on their educational background. RNs with a bachelor’s degree can complete an MSN-FNP degree program. Registered nurses who already have an MSN degree can get a Post-Master’s FNP Certificate. All of these FNP programs include at least 500 hours of supervised clinical work to fulfill certification requirements.

Become certified by passing the national FNP certification exam: Family nurse practitioners must be certified before they can be licensed. The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) both offer national FNP certifications, which require successful completion of an exam.

Apply for state licensure as an FNP: Once you have completed your master’s degree, clinical hours, and certification exam, you can apply for licensure as an FNP through your state nursing board. To maintain your license, you must fulfill clinical practice hours and complete continuing education requirements.

How Many Years Does it Take to Become a Family Nurse Practitioner?

By choosing to earn an RN to MSN-FNP degree, a registered nurse can become an FNP in just 32 months. Ultimately, though, the amount of time it takes to become a family nurse practitioner depends on your existing level of nursing and educational experience.

  • Someone with no background in nursing would take approximately six years to become an FNP (one to two years to get an associate’s degree or diploma and become an RN, then another four years to complete an RN to MSN-FNP degree program and become licensed as a family nurse practitioner).
  • A registered nurse with an associate’s degree or diploma would take just over four years to become an FNP (the length of an RN to MSN-FNP degree program plus time for certification and licensure).
  • A registered nurse with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree would take approximately three years to become an FNP (the length of an MSN-FNP degree program plus time for certification and licensure).
  • A registered nurse with a Master of Science in Nursing degree would take two years or less to become an FNP (the length of a Post-Master’s FNP certificate program plus time for certification and licensure).

A Complete Guide to Become a Family Nurse Practitioner (4)

Family Nurse Practitioner Practicum Requirement

To become certified and licensed as a family nurse practitioner, you must complete a minimum of 500 hours of supervised clinical hours in a relevant health care setting, such as a family practice clinic.

FNP degree and certificate programs include these clinical hours as part of the course requirements. At Carson-Newman Online, we help our online nursing students in master degree level courses by providing them with clinical placement advisors who help students find sites and preceptors (supervisors) in their local area, so they can get the clinical experience they need to feel confident and become certified as a FNP.

Family Nurse Practitioner Preceptors

A preceptor is a mentor who supervises you while you complete your minimum 500 hours of practicum clinical hours. Your preceptor will act as a role model who guides your professional development and monitors your progress while you complete your FNP program.

Preceptors must be board-certified nurse practitioners, physicians or physician’s assistants who hold an active practice license. At Carson-Newman Online, we help place you with a suitable preceptor in your local area to fulfill your clinical hours requirement for your MSN level courses.

Family Nurse Practitioner Certification

Certification is required to become a family nurse practitioner. Most FNPs opt for certification through one of two national nursing boards – the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP).

Both the ANCC and AANP require you to pass an exam in order to become FNP certified. The ANCC exam consists of 175-200 questions and takes around four hours to complete. The AANP exam consists of 150 questions and takes around three hours to complete. Both exams draw from material covered in an FNP degree or certificate program.

Upon achieving a passing grade on either exam, you can apply for state licensure as an FNP with your state nursing board.

Why Choose to Become a Family Nurse Practitioner?

There are numerous personal and professional reasons to consider becoming a family nurse practitioner. Many FNPs enter the profession because they feel a calling to provide primary care, while others are attracted to the high salary potential and increased autonomy available to family nurse practitioners.

Here are just a few reasons why you may want to choose an FNP career track:

  • Family nurse practitioners are in high demand: The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) predicts about 29,400 openings for Advanced Practice Nurses each year on average over the next decade.
  • Family nurse practitioners enjoy a low unemployment rate: The unemployment rate for FNPs is 1.2%, far lower than the national average.
  • Family nurse practitioners earn high wages: The median annual wage for a nurse practitioner is $120,680 according to the BLS, significantly higher than the median annual wage of a registered nurse.
  • Family nurse practitioners have more autonomy than registered nurses: In many states, FNPs have full practice authority, meaning they can run their own clinics, prescribe medications, and choose their own schedules.
  • Family nurse practitioners report high levels of job satisfaction: Relatively low stress and a great work-life balance means there is high job satisfaction among FNPs.
  • Families and communities depend on FNPs: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) predicts a shortage between 42,600 and 121,300 primary care physicians by 2030. Family nurse practitioners are needed to fill the gap left by physicians, especially in underserved communities and rural areas across the United States.

Learn more about the benefits of a career as a family nurse practitioner:

Family Nurse Practitioner Residency Programs

The term “residency” refers to on-the-job, paid post-graduate training. Unlike a physician, a family nurse practitioner does not have to complete a residency in order to become licensed. Instead, an FNP’s training is provided over the course of the minimum 500 hours of clinical work obtained during the MSN-FNP degree or post-graduate FNP certificate program.

However, it is becoming more common for organizations to offer residency programs for FNPs who want to obtain additional paid training before going into practice. The term “fellowship” is also often used to describe such programs. These programs can be a great way to enhance your skills, build your resume, or learn a new subspecialty.

Nurse Practitioner Professional Organizations

Once you have become a certified nurse practitioner, you can join national, international and state organizations that provide support, education and advocacy for NPs. These organizations are also a great way to access networking and continuing education opportunities.

National nurse practitioner organizations include:

International nurse practitioner organizations include:

Almost all states also have their own nurse practitioner organizations.

Family Nurse Practitioner Conferences

Several organizations hold annual conferences relevant to family nurse practitioners or to nurse practitioners more broadly. Attending one of these conferences can be a great way to network and to learn more about issues that are being faced by FNPs and NPs today.

The website www.nursepractitionerconferences.com maintains an extensive list of nurse practitioner conferences happening all across the country. The American Association of Nurse Practitioners also keeps a list of its own upcoming conferences and events.

Compare MSN-FNP Programs

Trying to figure out which online MSN-FNP program is best for your career involves a number of parameters, starting with flexibility. Nurses need to choose programs that balance clinical hours with study time, while keeping their job outlook in mind.

One of the most significant factors is undeniably cost. The career of an FNP can be satisfying as well as lucrative, but researching the cost of a degree is important given the difference in tuition across programs. Here's a tuition comparison chart that may help.

SchoolCost per creditNumber of CreditsCost of TuitionClinical Placement Provided?Number of Residencies Required
Carson-Newman$65046$29,900Yes1
Vanderbilt$1,71640$68,640Yes10
Walden$71558$41,470No0
Drexel$1,02656$57,456No2
Univ. of Tennessee$700 (in-state)67$46,900No2 per semester
Tennessee Tech$690 (in-state)46$31,740No0

*Based on publicly displayed information on university websites, as of April 2021

Sources:

2017 AANP National NP Compensation Survey. Purchased from the American Association of Nurse Practitioners website at https://my.aanp.org/ProductCatalog/ProductCategory.aspx?ID=14.

About the American Association of Nurse Practitioners: Historical Timeline. Retrieved from the American Association of Nurse Practitioners website at https://www.aanp.org/about/about-the-american-association-of-nurse-practitioners-aanp/historical-timeline.

ANCC vs. AANP: Which FNP Exam Should I Take? (Nov 2018). Retrieved from the Board Vitals website at https://www.boardvitals.com/blog/ancc-aanp-fnp-exam/.

How Long Should it Take to Train a Family Physician? (June 2015). Retrieved from the American Academy of Family Physicians website at https://www.aafp.org/news/blogs/freshperspectives/entry/how_long_should_it_take.html.

NP Fact Sheet (Jan 2019). Retrieved from the American Association of Nurse Practitioners website at https://www.aanp.org/about/all-about-nps/np-fact-sheet.

Nurse Anesthetists, Nurse Midwives, and Nurse Practitioners: Job Outlook (Apr 2018). Retrieved from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/health care/registered-nurses.htm.

Nurse Practitioner Overview(2020). Retrieved from https://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/nurse-practitioner.

Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2019: 29-1141 Registered Nurses. Retrieved fromhttps://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes291141.htm.

Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2019: 29-1171 Nurse Practitioners. Retrieved from https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes291171.htm.

Policy Priorities to Improve Our Nation's Health Physician Workforce Issues(May2018). Retrieved from the Association of American Medical Colleges website at https://www.aamc.org/system/files/c/2/472888-physicianworkforceissues.pdf.

State Practice Environment (Dec 2018). Retrieved from the American Association of Nurse Practitioners website at https://www.aanp.org/advocacy/state/state-practice-environment.

The 100 Best Jobs (2020). U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved from https://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/rankings/the-100-best-jobs.

Carson-Newman’s Family Nurse Practitioner Programs

If you are a registered nurse interested in becoming a family nurse practitioner, Carson-Newman University can set you on the path to your career goals, regardless of your current level of education.

If you are an RN with a BSN degree, choose the online MSN-FNP degree option and graduate in as few as 32 months.

If you are an RN with an MSN degree, choose the online post-master’s FNP certificate option and graduate in less than 24 months (on average).

Ready to get started? Request your FREE program guide below.

Request Your Free Program Brochure

A Complete Guide to Become a Family Nurse Practitioner (2024)

FAQs

How hard is FNP certification exam? ›

Is the FNP exam hard? Becoming a Certified Nurse Practitioner isn't easy, and yes, both the AANP and ANCC certification exams are challenging — very challenging. They will take a great deal of analytical thought, clinical judgement, and preparation.

How do I prepare for FNP? ›

How to Prepare for the Nurse Practitioner Board-Certification Exam
  1. Gather Study Resources and Review Materials. ...
  2. Create a Study Plan. ...
  3. Join a Study Group. ...
  4. Complete Online Practice Tests. ...
  5. Identify gaps in knowledge. ...
  6. Track study strategies. ...
  7. Reduce anxiety. ...
  8. Apply Knowledge.

How many questions is the NP certification exam? ›

The exam allows 3.5 hours to answer 175 questions (150 scored plus 25 pretest questions that are not scored).

What is the hardest part of nurse practitioner school? ›

Following are the 10 biggest challenges you will face as a nurse practitioner student and ways to overcome them.
  • Clinical hour requirement. ...
  • Clinical Placements. ...
  • Certification Exam. ...
  • Demanding and complex schedule. ...
  • Continuing to work full time. ...
  • Coursework. ...
  • Specialization. ...
  • Graduate Requirements.

What is the pass rate for FNP exam? ›

FNP Board Certification 100% Pass Rate Continues!
Family NPTotal
CERTIFICATIONS100,818120,851
Initial Examinations Administered18,995
Pass Rate85%
Jan 23, 2019

Which FNP certification is easiest? ›

The AANP is rumored to be the easier of the two exams, specifically for those seeking their FNP certification as it historically had a higher pass rate than that of the ANCC FNP exam.

How long should I study for FNP exam? ›

Plan to start studying for the FNP exam about six months prior to taking your exam. Starting 6 months in advance will allow you to make sure that you're completely prepared for the exam. Sit down with your calendar and develop a study schedule. Try to plan to study 2 to 3 hours a day 5 to 6 days a week.

How many times can you take the FNP exam? ›

Up to three times in a 12-month calendar period, waiting at least 60 days between each exam. If you fail, you can re-apply online (retest application), but wait at least 5 days after taking your exam to apply for the retest.

How long should I study for Aanp FNP exam? ›

Allow a minimum of 4 to 6 weeks of planned study after you complete the review course to maximize your likelihood of success on this important high-stakes exam.

What are the two types of NP exams? ›

There are two main certifying bodies - the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP). For the most part, the exams are similar, and both will certify you to practice as an FNP.

How long is NP class? ›

Because of the in-depth training required to become a nurse practitioner and the educational requirements to become licensed, many years of formal education are required beyond high school. It usually takes at least 6 to 8 years of education and training to become an NP.

Do you have to pass the Nclex to be a NP? ›

The first step to becoming a nurse practitioner is earning a BSN. Next, you'll need to pass the NCLEX and get licensed, gain experience as an RN, and enroll in a program to earn your MSN or DNP.

Which NP is the easiest? ›

WHAT ARE THE EASIEST NURSE PRACTITIONER SPECIALTIES TO GET ACCEPTED INTO?
  1. Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner. ...
  2. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner. ...
  3. Family Nurse Practitioner. ...
  4. Occupational Health Nurse Practitioners (OHNP) ...
  5. Aesthetic Nurse Practitioner.

How old are most NP students? ›

The average age of a nurse practitioner is 43.4 years old, but the nurse practitioner age range starts between 20 and 24 years to 65 years old and over. Most nurse practitioners are between 35 and 44 years old, equaling almost 39% of all nurse practitioners in the United States.

Is FNP harder than nursing school? ›

Courses and content are more challenging. The level of knowledge you're required to have as a Nurse Practitioner is a huge step up from a RN. You'll take a lot of the same courses as you did with your BSN, but will go into each topic with a lot more depth because you'll be diagnosing and treating health problems soon.

How many questions do you need to get right to pass the ANCC FNP exam? ›

To pass the ANCC examination, an examinee must achieve a scale score of 350 or higher. Prior to conversion of an examinee's score to this scale, the examinee's raw score on the examination is determined, which is simply the number of test items that the examinee answered correctly (e.g., 105 out of 150).

Is the Aanp FNP exam hard? ›

Deep dive into these two questions to guide your path of studying and once you feel confident in answering the above, take that as your cue to test again. According to statistics, 86% pass AANP on the first try – it's hard.

How many questions does FNP mastery have? ›

1,600+ board-style practice questions, full of rationales and medical descriptions.

Which NP is most needed? ›

According to the American Association of Nurse Practitioners and labor statistics, the most in-demand specialties for NP include:
  • Family (70.3%)
  • Adult-Gerontology Primary Care (8.9%)
  • Psychiatric/Mental Health (6.5%).
Apr 10, 2023

What is the best NP to become? ›

WHAT ARE THE BEST NURSE PRACTITIONER SPECIALTIES?
  • Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner. ...
  • Cardiology Nurse Practitioner. ...
  • Aesthetic Nurse Practitioner. ...
  • Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner. ...
  • Pain Management Nurse Practitioner. ...
  • Emergency Department Nurse Practitioner. ...
  • Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner.

Is there a difference between FNP and NP? ›

An NP allows you to specialize in several areas like pediatrics or women's health, but if you're more interested in family medicine, you can go with an FNP. While NPs typically work with specific age groups or health conditions, FNP focus on patients of all ages.

How do I study for the NP test? ›

How to Study for the NP Certification Exam
  1. Schedule the Exam Wisely. Begin by selecting a time for taking the certification exam that allows at least six to eight weeks for preparation. ...
  2. Understand Your Study Style. ...
  3. Practice Time Management. ...
  4. Identify Knowledge Gaps. ...
  5. Consider Study Tools. ...
  6. Practice Self-Care.

Is being an FNP stressful? ›

High Stress Levels

They deal with sick or injured patients on a regular basis and are responsible for patients' treatment plans. This is a huge responsibility for the nurse, and in some cases, a patient cannot be treated or saved creating further emotional stress.

What is a normal day for an FNP? ›

There's no such thing as a “typical day” for a family nurse practitioner (FNP). FNPs work with patients of all ages. They can perform similar functions as a physician and work in many different environments, including hospitals, urgent care clinics, and private practices.

What happens if you don't pass NCLEX in 3 years? ›

If you have not passed the NCLEX by the three-year anniversary of your graduation, you will have to attend a nursing education program before you may take the exam again.

How soon after failing AANP can you retest? ›

If you do not pass a certification exam, you may apply to retest after 60 days. Applicants may not test more than 3 times in any 12 months.

What is the nurse practitioner exam like? ›

The FNP exam contains 175 multiple-choice questions, 25 of which are not scored, and you will be given a time limit of 3.5 hours.

What is the pass rate for AANP and ANCC? ›

The pass rates are not very different; for 2021, the AANP pass rate was 84% (for FNP), and the pass rate for the ANCC was 87% (for FNP). The cost is similar; as of this writing, the AANP test is $315, and the ANCC test is $395, and both organizations offer a discount to their members.

How do I pass my AANP for the first time? ›

Getting Ready For The AANP Exam
  1. STEP 1 Do NOT wait too long post graduation to take the boards! ...
  2. STEP 2 Do review Leik and Fitzgerald! ...
  3. STEP 3 Do take the PSI practice test (75 questions), APEA predictor exam (150 questions), and ExamEdge (5 tests) ...
  4. STEP 4 Do set a schedule of studying. ...
  5. STEP 5 Do relax the night before.
Jan 30, 2023

How many versions of the AANP FNP exam are there? ›

PLEASE NOTE: There are three versions of the FNP practice exam, two versions of the AGNP practice exam, and only one version of the ENP practice exam. Candidates should note the different options when choosing to purchase an AANPCB Practice Examination more than once.

Who are the highest-paid nurses? ›

What is the highest-paid nurse? Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists! Earning $195,610 annually, CRNAs earn significantly more than any other type of nurse or nursing specialty.

Can you be a NP with two specialties? ›

NPs can obtain multiple degrees across multiple specialties, or they may choose to just focus on one area. Depending on your geographic region, knowledge about specialty NPs may be fairly uncommon, or a specialty certification may be the only way to get a job in a particular area.

Which test should I take ANCC or AANP? ›

The AANP exam is a multiple choice exam. The ANCC exam contains several question types: multiple choice, multiple response, drop and drag, and hot spot. If you are not comfortable with question formats that are not multiple choice, AANP testing may be a good choice for you.

Is NP-hard the hardest? ›

P includes O(n), O(n2), O(n10), O(n100), etc. If something is hard for a class (e.g. NP-hard) it is at least as hard as the hardest problems in class.

Is NP-hard a class? ›

In computational complexity theory, NP-hardness (non-deterministic polynomial-time hardness) is the defining property of a class of problems that are informally "at least as hard as the hardest problems in NP". A simple example of an NP-hard problem is the subset sum problem.

Is NP-complete hard? ›

"NP-complete problems are difficult because there are so many different solutions." On the one hand, there are many problems that have a solution space just as large, but can be solved in polynomial time (for example minimum spanning tree).

What happens if you fail the NCLEX twice? ›

Though the vast majority of candidates pass the exam the first time, those who fail are permitted to retake it after 45 days from their original test date. Candidates may retest as many as 8 times in a year. Candidates must pass NCLEX within three years from when they graduated nursing school.

How many people fail the NCLEX? ›

The National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) reports 13.43% of NCLEX-RN candidates fail the exam on their first attempt. The number of unsuccessful test-takers is low compared to the more than 86% who pass the exam on their first try.

Can you be a nurse if you fail the NCLEX? ›

All nurses have to pass the NCLEX to acquire a nursing license and practice. If you fail the exam, you should reschedule and restudy as soon as possible to get closer to working as a nurse. In some states, you must inform your employer once you learn you didn't pass the NCLEX (if you're already employed).

What is the lowest GPA for NP school? ›

Many schools will require a 3.0 GPA to get into nurse practitioner school. Based on the type of NP program you are applying for (MSN or DNP), your GPA will be calculated from your bachelorly or master's degree coursework.

Is medical school harder than NP school? ›

These are 3-5 year programs, where you will take both the NCLEX to earn your RN but also complete a master's or doctorate program to become an NP. It's not just the duration of training, but also the competitiveness and rigor of each path. Getting into medical school is by far the most competitive of the three.

Is there anything higher than a NP? ›

A Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) is a terminal educational degree, while a nurse practitioner (NP) is a professional role and job title. Nurse practitioners can be prepared at the master's level or earn a DNP degree. As you explore advancing your nursing career, you may be comparing DNP vs master's NP programs.

Who is the youngest registered nurse? ›

Elliana Tenenbaum turned 15 on Thanksgiving, and next month she is headed to nursing school at Arizona State University. If all goes as planned, she will graduate ASU as the youngest person in the country to hold a Bachelor of Science in nursing.

Is 60 too old for nursing school? ›

A common question often asked by nontraditional students is whether or not they're too old to go to nursing school. The short answer is that you're never too old to go to nursing school. Even if you're not physically able to do certain nursing jobs, there are other nursing specialties you're going to be able to do.

Is NP the highest level of nursing? ›

A DNP is the highest level of education certification available to nurses, and its curriculum centers on various healthcare research methods, data analysis, and evidence-based nursing practice—making it ideal for NPs who want to hold leadership or senior-level positions, educate other nurses, perform advanced patient ...

What is the hardest part of being a nurse practitioner? ›

WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES OF BEING A NURSE PRACTITIONER?
  1. Emotional work. ...
  2. Varying hours. ...
  3. Working with people. ...
  4. Power imbalance and hierarchy. ...
  5. Not being able to help everyone. ...
  6. Restrictive practice settings. ...
  7. Being challenged too little or not enough. ...
  8. Charting, charting, and more charting.

How long should you study for FNP exam? ›

Plan to start studying for the FNP exam about six months prior to taking your exam. Starting 6 months in advance will allow you to make sure that you're completely prepared for the exam. Sit down with your calendar and develop a study schedule. Try to plan to study 2 to 3 hours a day 5 to 6 days a week.

How long should I study for AANP FNP exam? ›

Allow a minimum of 4 to 6 weeks of planned study after you complete the review course to maximize your likelihood of success on this important high-stakes exam.

Is the FNP exam like the Nclex? ›

The Test Format

These exams are computer-based tests (CBTs), which differ from the computer-adaptive NCLEX-RN® exam.

What are the two certification exams for FNP? ›

There are two main certifying bodies - the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP). For the most part, the exams are similar, and both will certify you to practice as an FNP.

What is the pass rate for AANP vs ANCC? ›

The pass rates are not very different; for 2021, the AANP pass rate was 84% (for FNP), and the pass rate for the ANCC was 87% (for FNP). The cost is similar; as of this writing, the AANP test is $315, and the ANCC test is $395, and both organizations offer a discount to their members.

Can I take AANP if I fail ANCC? ›

If you fail the AANP exam, can you take the ANCC exam (and vice versa)?* The AANP and the ANCC are completely separate organizations and they do not communicate about an individual's exam status. * You may take and retake either exam as long as you meet the board's eligibility requirements for testing and retesting.

How soon after failing AANP exam can you retake? ›

If you do not pass a certification exam, you may apply to retest after 60 days. Applicants may not test more than 3 times in any 12 months.

How many questions is the FNP AANP exam? ›

A candidate's score is based solely on the 135 scored questions. Of the 150 questions, 15 are pretest questions. Pretest questions are used on the examinations to obtain statistical information for determining how well they perform prior to vetting them for use on the scored portion of the examination.

What is the hardest exam for nurses? ›

Preparing to take the NCLEX is enough to make just about anyone nervous. It's a difficult exam, and a major stepping stone in your career as a registered nurse. Remember that most people pass the NCLEX on the first try. However, preparation and confidence are key to passing.

Are there pictures on the Aanp exam? ›

You may see one chest film and/or one EKG strip. There are not color photographs, drag-and-drop, or hot spots in this exam. How many times per year can I retake the exams? AANPCB: up to 2 times per calendar year (submit 15 contact hours continuing education).

What is the hardest part of the NCLEX? ›

Let's look at the 16 most common challenges NCLEX candidates face and ways you can overcome them.
  1. Second-Guessing Your Abilities. ...
  2. Changing Answers Repeatedly. ...
  3. Reading Questions Too Fast. ...
  4. Cramming Before the Test. ...
  5. Not Using the Right Study Tools. ...
  6. Not Getting Enough Rest Before the Test. ...
  7. Reading Too Much into a Question.

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